In criminal law, the practice area spans a vast range of matters, and the need for individuals facing the threat of criminal prosecution to secure experienced counsel is great.  Included in this category are homicides (ranging from intentional murder to reckless manslaughter and death-by-auto), assault, kidnapping, sexual offenses, robbery, bias crimes, arson, other property crimes, criminal mischief, burglary, theft, forgery, drug offenses, gambling, perjury, firearms violations, and other weapons offenses. Family-related offenses, such as endangering the welfare of a minor and domestic violence, also fall within this group.

A general power of attorney gives broad powers to a person or organization (known as an agent or attorney-in-fact) to act in your behalf. These powers include handling financial and business transactions, buying life insurance, settling claims, operating business interests, making gifts, and employing professional help.

When a person dies, all of his or her possessions – real estate, money, stocks, personal belongings, etc. – become a part of his or her estate. Estate administration refers to the process of collecting and managing the estate, paying any debts and taxes, and distributing the remaining property to the heirs of the estate. The heirs of an estate are determined by will, and if there isn't a will, by the intestacy laws of each state.

A trust is an arrangement in which one or more people manage or take care of the property for someone else's benefit. You can use the trust to gather your property under one document so that the property is distributed efficiently after your death.  

A will or testament is a legal document by which a person, the testator, expresses their wishes as to how their property is to be distributed at death, and names one or more persons, the executor, to manage the estate until its final distribution.